Dog Breeds/Rottweiler

The Rottweiler, nicknamed Rottie, has a long and illustrious history. Originating from Germany, the Rottweiler was bred to be a herding dog with guarding instincts.

The Rottweiler's ancestors were dogs used by drovers of the Roman army to maintain the herds that accompanied the legionnaires in their march across Europe.

These herds were the army's source of food. Admiring the herding and protective instincts of the Rottweiler's ancestors, the Germans began selectively breeding for these traits.

With modern advances, the need for herding diminished and the dog almost became extinct. The last female dog in Rottweiler, Germany was used to save the breed.

The Rottweiler is a medium dog with a medium length black coat and rich rust to mahogany markings. The dog's head is wide between the ears with powerful jaws and tapers to a broad black nose.

Their ears lay flat against the sides of their head. Rottweilers are usually born with a bobbed tail. This is a robust dog with well-defined muscles in its thighs and a deep, broad chest.

Height for males is 24 to 27 inches at the withers and weight is between 110 and 130 pounds. Female standards are a height of 22 to 25 inches and weight of 90 to 105 pounds.

The temperament of the Rottweiler is to guard, protect and serve. But, they can also have the softer side of a big, funny, cuddly please-rub-my-tummy baby which family, people they know and people they are properly introduced to, get to see.

Environment and training can have significant effects on the temperament of this breed.

Sure of himself, the Rottweiler's nature is calm and confident. They are an intelligent animal and tend to adopt a wait and see attitude when they sense changes to their environment.

The dog will spring into action if it senses a threat to its family, friends or territory. The Rottweiler has performed heroic actions in service to its family or work. The Rottweiler can be found working as police dogs, guard dogs, service dogs and search and rescue dogs.

Allowing the Rottweiler the correct introduction to new people and training can eliminate unpleasant situations and create a dog that can provide valuable assistance or joy as a family member.

Family and friends may think the Rottweiler is a bit of a clown. They will roll over on their backs and wiggle around wanting a much favored belly rub.

Or, they may greet a person with a big wet lick to the exposed foot in the flip-flop. Children think Rottweiler's make great floor pillows for watching TV. A dog that enjoys participating in a good game of football, the Rottweiler can also be a good couch potato who would like nothing better than to sit on a lap.

The American Kennel Club, AKC, recognized the Rottweiler in 1937. The Rottweiler has had a memorable history, faced extinction and survived to assist people and be a loyal companion.

Save

Leave a Comment